September 1, 2014

#3for21: 21 Days of Gratitude

The other day I read that thinking of three things you’re grateful for every day for 21 days can lead to a happier life. Despite the many great things in my life, I’ve been in a bit of a funk lately. It’s time to change that.

I’ve written about gratitude on this blog and even tried to keep a private gratitude in the past, but I find that sharing things with the world holds me accountable. So today, Sept. 1 serves as day one of my personal #3for21 challenge.

If you’re in need of a bit of happiness, an attitude adjustment or just a new creative outlet, I encourage you to join me! Post whatever medium (photo, text, video, etc.) you like wherever you feel most comfortable (e.g., Tumblr, Instagram, Twitter).

Tag your posts with #3for21 so we can follow along with each other. :)

<3,

Jasmine
lovesholiday
@loves_holiday (IG & Twitter)

June 27, 2014
9 shames

1. It’s a shame that I cut my eyes or adopt a mean face when men look at me, because I don’t want them to think I’m interested or open to what they have to say.

2. It’s a shame that I cut my eyes or adopt a mean face and they still try to talk to me, as if my body language isn’t clear.

3. It’s a shame that, when I cut my eyes or adopt a mean face and say that I’m not interested, it’s not enough.

4. It’s a shame that I have to mention or point out my boyfriend to get them to go away.

5. It’s a shame that I need a male friend to convince them to leave me alone.

6. It’s a shame that I thank the men who are relatively “nice” when approaching me for not being rude or angry when I turn them down.

7. It’s a shame that I thanked a man who followed me out to my car because he “didn’t want to interrupt my workout” but seemed to think rolling up on me was less intrusive.

8. It’s a shame that there are probably plenty of men who aren’t even thinking about me when I walk down the street, yet I still feel wary.

9. It’s a shame that I could tell any of these statements to another woman and she’d understand so deeply.

March 9, 2014

Sample Sundays: “Wildflower,” Hank Crawford (1973)

Today’s song was sampled by some of hip hop’s most beloved artists, including a former television star and the son of Black Panthers.

Press play and see if you can figure out who sampled “Wildflower” and what songs were created from it. Read on to see if you’re right!

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November 28, 2013
thankful, too.

(a follow-up to last year’s list)

Jasmine, Jasmine Lee, love's holiday, love's holiday blog, @loves_holiday, lovesholiday, thankful, gratitude, Thanksgiving

I’m also thankful for…

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November 25, 2013
I was driving home this morning and something happened that made me instantly think of a caption and a social network. Now, what that something was, I can&#8217;t tell you. That&#8217;s how insignificant it was. But my immediate reaction was to share some clever mess online in hopes of being showered with likes, comments and retweets.
That experience and internal dialogue is not uncommon. About an hour before writing this, I pulled out my copy of &#8220;August: Osage County&#8221; and found a ticket stub from Brown University&#8217;s 2009 Spring Weekend. Somehow my mind drifted past the mesmerized feelings I&#8217;d had during my first crack at Brown&#8217;s legendary SPRING WEEKEND and instead went straight to &#8220;Ooo! Let me Instagram this!&#8221; I know I&#8217;m not the only one whose mind operates this way.
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What is this strange compulsion for posting everything online? Why have we succumbed to this "Dear Diary" syndrome where we feel comfortable to spill out the contents of our minds onto the World Wide Web?
For two reasons, I imagine. First is the illusion of closeness. With so many social networks, we have a perceived audience of friends and family accessible at the push of a key (or, touch of a screen). We envision these people to be ready, willing and waiting to hear our every thought and feeling, no matter how ill-conceived or irrelevant. For example, we fill out status boxes to tell our Facebook &#8220;friends&#8221; how we feel each day or what&#8217;s on our minds at the moments of our choosing. The problem is&#8230; most of these people aren&#8217;t actually our friends or family! Furthermore, even our true friends and family don&#8217;t want to see our every misguided attempt at humor, provocation or insightfulness. Don&#8217;t get me wrong, I love to learn how the people in my life think. I enjoy healthy (well, maybe not healthy), awesome Internet relationships with my friends, especially those who live hundreds of miles away from me. I&#8217;m even grateful for the things I learn from the random postings of my acquaintances. But none of that changes the facts that we are all really not that close, the Internet is not a diary and not everything we post will be seen as purposeful.
All of that leads to the second reason we put everything online. I call it the illusion of celebrity. Because we now understand that we aren&#8217;t at all as close to most of our online friends as we act like we are, that closeness is just an illusion. When we take away the close relationship but hold onto the &#8220;People still care about what I think and do&#8221; idea, we are placing ourselves in a position of celebrity. Think about Twitter. It abandons Facebook&#8217;s &#8220;friend&#8221; system in favor of &#8220;following&#8221; and &#8220;followers.&#8221; Celebrities have followers. Beyoncé has people who are invested in her every move and thought. Does she keep up with what they think and do each day? No way! Because she&#8217;s the celebrity and they are the followers. Same goes with each of us online. Now, sure, sometimes we do actually care about the people who care about us. Even Beyoncé cares what&#8217;s up with other celebrities (Jay-no-hyphen-Z, Solange, etc.). But only if she has some offline relationship with them! You think Beyoncé really cares about what&#8217;s going on with Keri Hilson? Of course not. And we don&#8217;t really care about what&#8217;s going on with all of our Internet amigos.
It sounds harsh, I know, but it&#8217;s true. I don&#8217;t mean to imply that we couldn&#8217;t care less about these people. In fact, I genuinely wish the best for each friend and follower I have. The thing is, I want relationships with them&#8212;real, live, offline relationships where we can all stop hiding behind computer screens and tablets and step into the gloriousness that is true care, concern and connection.

I was driving home this morning and something happened that made me instantly think of a caption and a social network. Now, what that something was, I can’t tell you. That’s how insignificant it was. But my immediate reaction was to share some clever mess online in hopes of being showered with likes, comments and retweets.

That experience and internal dialogue is not uncommon. About an hour before writing this, I pulled out my copy of “August: Osage County” and found a ticket stub from Brown University’s 2009 Spring Weekend. Somehow my mind drifted past the mesmerized feelings I’d had during my first crack at Brown’s legendary SPRING WEEKEND and instead went straight to “Ooo! Let me Instagram this!” I know I’m not the only one whose mind operates this way.

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November 7, 2013

Thoughtful Thursday Music: “The Joy,” Milo&Otis (2013)

I’m so incredibly excited to share this beautiful video with you all today! As I wrote earlier this year, Milo&Otis is an amazing Chicago-based duo, made up of two of my classmates from Brown University. Their debut album “The Joy,” released in May 2012, features 11 tracks of soulful goodness, including a love song featuring Chance the Rapper. If you don’t want to take my word for it, just read the news; Milo&Otis has been featured in magazines, newspapers (Washington Post, anyone?) and “artists to watch out for” lists for a minute now.

These two deserve all the shine they receive and more. Please support them by listening and sharing their music - thank you in advance!

TODAY’S TASK:Look at your life, look at the joy you give!” Have faith, no matter what.

(Get more Milo&Otis: Bandcamp / Facebook / Milo’s Twitter / Otis’ Twitter)